MAE Master of Science Program

The M.S. Program in Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering at UC San Diego is a flexible program with grounding in MAE fundamentals and a focus on the next generation of mechanical engineering.

Mechanical Engineering is one of the most diverse fields in engineering. Today, successful M.S.-level engineers must:

  • Have command of fundamental MAE core subjects
  • Have working knowledge of contemporarily relevant subjects

M.S. students in Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering at UC San Diego have the option to conduct research with a faculty member while taking classes, culminating in a Master's Thesis (Plan I), or the option to focus on our specifically-designed coursework curriculum culminating in a Comprehensive Examination (Plan II).

The MAE M.S. Coursework program (Plan II) at UC San Diego is uniquely designed to provide students with the opportunity to design a customized curriculum leading to a well-rounded background in engineering fundamentals while providing exposure and working knowledge of contemporary subjects preparing them to become the next generation of industry-leading Mechanical Engineers.

MS Time Limit Policy: Full-time MS students are permitted seven quarters in which to complete all requirements (The soonest you can complete the MS degree is 3 quarters or one Academic Year) While there are no written time limits for part-time students, the department has the right to intervene and set individual deadlines if it becomes necessary. 

 


Master’s Plan I - Thesis Defense

MS students who pursue Plan I have the option to earn a MS Degree in any of the following UCSD Graduate Major Codes:

  • MC75 - Engineering Sciences (Aerospace Engineering)
  • MC76 - Engineering Sciences (Applied Mechanics)
  • MC78 - Engineering Sciences (Applied Ocean Science)
  • MC80 - Engineering Sciences (Engineering Physics)
  • MC81 - Engineering Sciences (Mechanical Engineering)

The following degree titles will be available beginning in FA23:

  • MC91 - Engineering Sciences (Computational Engineering & Science)
  • MC92 - Engineering Sciences (Power & Energy Systems)
  • MC93 - Engineering Sciences (Controls & Mechatronics)
  • MC94 - Engineering Sciences (Biomechanics & Biomedical Engineering)

Program Requirements

MAE MS Program Requirements Checklist - Plan I (Thesis Defense) Students will use this checklist to plan their Master's program coursework and to make sure they are meeting Degree requirements (the coursework requirements below will be the same no matter which Major Code a Plan I  Student chooses)

This plan of study involves both coursework and research, culminating in the preparation of a thesis. A total of 36 units of credit are required: 24 units (6 courses) must be in course work, and 12 units must be in research. The student's program is arranged, with approval of the Faculty Advisor, according to the following policies:

   1. A maximum of 8 units of MAE 296 and 298 may be applied toward the course work requirement.

   2. A maximum of 12 units of upper-division 100-level courses may be applied toward the course work requirement. However, if you choose 12 units of 100-level courses, you most likely will not have the required knowledge to complete a successful thesis (this includes upper division Undergraduate coursework in MAE or other Departments)

Students must maintain at least a B average (3.00 GPA) in the courses taken to fulfill the degree requirements.  All courses that are used to satisfy degree requirements must be taken for a letter grade, with the exception of MAE 299 research units, which can only be taken as S/U.

The 36 units should be arranged into three areas, organized as follows:

   Specialization 1: 3 classes (4 units each course)

   Specialization 2: 3 classes (4 units each course)

  Thesis Research: 12 units of MAE 299 research

Areas of Specialization are chosen from the MAE Graduate Course Structure for MS and PhD students. The Thesis Research requirement can only consist of 12 units of MAE 299 research.

Current MAE Specialization Areas:

  • Adaptive Systems and Dynamic Modeling
  • Applied Plasma Physics
  • Biomechanics
  • Thermal Sciences & Combustion
  • Design
  • Environmental Engineering
  • Fluid Mechanics
  • Linear & Optimal Control
  • Materials Science
  • Solid Mechanics
  • Applied Atmospheric Sciences
  • Basic Science
  • Mathematics

 Students should reference the MAE Graduate Course Structure for MS and PhD students to determine which courses they will select to complete the Specialization coursework. Course plans must satisfy the coursework requirements described above and must be reviewed and approved by the Student’s MAE Faculty Advisor. 

Thesis Preparation / Defense

Students electing Plan I must submit and defend a Thesis. Those students are responsible for completing all of the requirements described above as well as those described on the Division of Graduate Education and Postdoctoral Affairs Dissertation & Thesis Submission webpage. A Student can take the oral defense twice. If the Student does not pass the oral exam the second time, there will not be a third exam and the student will not be permitted to continue in the program and will not be awarded the MS degree.

Thesis Committee

The thesis committee, selected by the Student and their Faculty Advisor, consists of at least three UCSD Faculty Members, at least two of which must be MAE faculty Members. The thesis committee must adhere to the requirements outlined on the Division of Graduate Education and Postdoctoral Affairs Doctoral and Master’s Committees webpage.

Example MS Thesis Committee

  • Committee Member 1 (Committee Chair) - MAE Faculty Advisor
  • Committee Member 2 - MAE Faculty Member
  • Committee Member 3 - MAE Faculty Member or Faculty Member from another UCSD Department

Students should refer to the MAE MS Plan I Thesis Defense Checklist to ensure that they complete all of the steps required of their MAE MS Thesis Defense.

Students must notify an MAE Graduate Coordinator of their intent to hold the MS Thesis Defense at least four weeks prior to the defense by submitting the MAE Graduate Exam Form

For all questions related to the MS Plan I program, please contact mae-mats-academicadvising@eng.ucsd.edu or reach out through 1-1 Graduate Advising

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Master’s Plan II- Comprehensive Exam 

Students admitted to the program prior to Fall 2022 may follow the degree requirements listed here, or may follow the degree requirements listed below. All students admitted for or after the Fall 2022 term must complete the requirements listed below.

In order to satisfy degree requirements, students must:

  • Satisfy the coursework requirement by completing 36 units of coursework as described in the programs below. All courses used to satisfy degree requirements must be taken for a letter grade, and students must maintain a minimum grade point average (GPA) of 3.0.
  • Satisfy the Comprehensive Examination (Comp Exam) requirement by earning a passing grade in at least 3 comp exam components. Each program includes 5 courses which include a comp exam component, and the format of the component will be described in the course syllabus. It is recommended that students attempt all comprehensive exam components until they satisfy the requirement. 
  • Satisfy the minimum residence requirement by successfully completing at least 6 units per quarter, for at least 3 quarters. The Department recommends that students register full-time (12 units) each quarter. Students must also advance to candidacy for the MS degree by week 3 of the quarter that they intend to graduate; instructions are sent out by the department on a quarterly basis.  

Programs Available Fall 2022

MC81 - (Mechanical Engineering)

 

Core Program

The Core MS program is uniquely designed to provide students with the opportunity to design a customized curriculum leading to a well-rounded background in engineering fundamentals while providing exposure and working knowledge of contemporary subjects preparing them to become the next generation of industry-leading Mechanical Engineers.

 

MC81 - MAE MS Program Requirements Checklist - Plan II (Comprehensive Exam) Students will use this checklist to plan their Master's program coursework and to make sure they are meeting Degree requirements.

Curriculum Requirements
I. ONE REQUIRED CORE COURSE

MAE 208 Mathematics for Engineers*

II. FOUR EMPHASIS COURSES

Select 4 courses (16 units) from the following list:

  • MAE 200 Controls* 
  • MAE 201 Mechanics of Fluids*
  • MAE 202 Thermal Processes*
  • MAE 203 Solid Mechanics & Materials*
  • MAE 204 Robotics*
  • MAE 206 Energy Systems*
  • MAE 209 Continuum Mechanics Applied to Medicine/Biology*

III. FOUR PERMITTED ELECTIVES
Select 4 courses (16 units) in MAE or another STEM field

  • At least 1 course (4 units) must be a 200-level course in MAE or another STEM field.
  • No more than 3 courses (12 units) of upper-division, 100-level coursework in a STEM field may be used to satisfy elective requirements.
  • Units for seminar courses (like MAE 205) or units for graduate research (like MAE 299) may not be used to satisfy elective requirements.
  • No more than 8 units of MAE 296 and/or MAE 298 may be used to satisfy elective requirements.
  • No more than 4 units from the ENG series may be used to satisfy elective requirements.

 

 

MC75 - (Aerospace Engineering)

 

Aerospace Engineering Systems

The engineering systems employed in aeronautical and space applications are characterized by their high efficiency and reliability. They must be able to operate in adverse environments under varying ambient conditions and meet stringent weight and operational cost constraints. As a result, their design is a challenging task that requires a deep understanding of the complex underlying physics and chemical processes involved in their operation. In most cases, the design includes an important optimization component that requires application of advanced quantitative techniques. The AES track is designed to respond to these needs by providing students with fundamental knowledge pertaining to the processes involved in aerospace systems, along with a set of advanced computational tools that are currently used in the aerospace industry.

Target Skill Sets and Learning Outcomes

Students are exposed to a rigorous curriculum covering fundamental aspects of aerospace engineering. Courses cover advanced concepts in quantitative methods, fluid mechanics, heat transfer, combustion and propulsion, and space engineering.

 

MC75 - MAE MS Program Requirements Checklist - Plan II (Comprehensive Exam) Students will use this checklist to plan their Master's program coursework and to make sure they are meeting Degree requirements.

Curriculum Requirements

FALL

WINTER

SPRING

MAE 208. Mathematics for Engineers*

MAE 212. Introductory Compressible Flow*

MAE 207. Space Flight Mechanics*

MAE 210A. Fluid Mechanics I*

Elective

Elective

MAE 221A. Heat Transfer*

Elective

Elective

*Course includes a comprehensive exam component

Permitted Electives:

  • MAE 207. Multidisciplinary Design Optimization
  • MAE 207. Multiphase Flow and Heat Transfer
  • MAE 207. Uncertainty Quantification
  • MAE 210B. Fluid Mechanics II
  • MAE 210C. Fluid Mechanics III
  • MAE 211. Introduction to Combustion
  • MAE 213. Mechanics of Propulsion
  • MAE 214A. Introduction to Turbulence and Turbulent Mixing
  • MAE 221C. Convection Heat Transfer
  • MAE 221D. Radiation Heat Transfer
  • MAE 290B. Numerical Methods for Differential Equations
  • MAE 290C. Computational Fluid Dynamics
  • MAE 294B. Introduction to Applied Mathematics II
  • MAE 294C. Introduction to Applied Mathematics III
MC76 - (Applied Mechanics)

Materials & Robotic Design

Robots are typically designed to be as rigid as possible, which simplifies the design and control of these systems. However, there is growing interest in the use of advanced materials in the design of sensors, actuators, and mechanisms for robotics that provide capabilities seen previously only in biological systems. This MS program focuses on the range of topics required to design and analyze this new kind of robotic system including: the mechanical behavior of materials, the numerical simulation of deformation and stress fields in various structures, and the design and fabrication of novel robotic devices. The courses of the program prepare students to understand the mechanical properties of materials and key design principles for robotics. 

Target Skill Sets and Learning Outcomes

Successful completion of this MS degree will enable students from various backgrounds to quantitatively characterize and analyze the mechanical performance of structures and design/fabricate robots for real applications. From the courses of the program, students will learn the fundamental theories to model deformation and motion of materials and robotic structures.

 

MC76 - MAE MS Program Requirements Checklist - Plan II (Comprehensive Exam) Students will use this checklist to plan their Master's program coursework and to make sure they are meeting Degree requirements.

Curriculum Requirements

FALL

WINTER

SPRING

MAE 203. Solid Mechanics & Materials*

MAE 207. Bioinspired Mobile Robotics*+

Elective

MAE 232A. Finite Element Methods in Solid Mechanics I*

MAE 204. Robotics*

Elective

MATS 257. Polymer Science & Engineering*

Elective

Elective

*Course includes a comprehensive exam component

Permitted Electives:

  • MAE 207. Design and Control of Haptic Systems
  • MAE 207. Soft Robotics
  • MAE 231A. Foundations of Solid Mechanics
  • MAE 231B. Elasticity
  • MAE 232B. Finite Element Methods in Solid Mechanics II
  • MAE 232C. Finite Element Methods in Solid Mechanics III
  • MAE 276. Mechanics of Soft Materials
  • MATS 261B. Mechanical Behavior of Polymers and Composites
MC78 - (Applied Ocean Science)

Applied Ocean Science / Environmental Flows

Applied Ocean Science (AOS) is an interdisciplinary track focused on the application of advanced technology to ocean research, exploration, and observation.  In addition to the ever-present needs associated with traditional marine applications, changing climate, hazards due to extreme weather events along with new marine energy ventures have created new demands for engineers who are familiar with the ocean. The AOS specialization aims to build on existing synergies with the Scripps Institution of Oceanography to produce graduates who combine strong engineering fundamentals with knowledge in ocean processes, data analysis, and ocean instrumentation.
 

Target Skill Sets and Learning Outcomes

This track will provide students with a strong foundation in ocean physics and environmental flows along with preparation in important ocean engineering topics including acoustics and marine instrumentation.  The AOS track will allow students to choose course sequences focused on ocean physics, signal processing, data analysis, or numerical methods. Robotics and controls will provide a foundation for autonomous and remotely operated underwater vehicle applications.

 

MC78 - MAE MS Program Requirements Checklist - Plan II (Comprehensive Exam) Students will use this checklist to plan their Master's program coursework and to make sure they are meeting Degree requirements.

Curriculum Requirements

FALL

WINTER

SPRING

MAE 210A. Fluid Mechanics I*

MAE 210B. Fluid Mechanics II*

MAE 207. Ocean Technology Design and Development*

MAE 208. Mathematics for Engineers*

Elective

MAE 224A. Environmental Fluid Dynamics I*

Elective

Elective

Elective

*Course includes a comprehensive exam component
Students must complete four different elective courses from the list below including both courses from at least one sequence.

Ocean Physics Sequence:

  • SIOC 210. Physical Oceanography
  • SIOC 202A. Fundamentals of Wave Physics

Signal Processing Sequence:

  • SIOC 207A. Fundamentals of Digital Signal Processing
  • ECE 251A. Digital Signal Processing I or SIOC 207B. Digital Signal Processing I

Data Analysis Sequence:

  • SIOC 221A. Analysis of Physical Oceanographic Data A
  • ECE 228. Machine Learning for Physical Applications

Numerical Methods Sequence:

  • MAE 290A. Numerical Methods for Linear Algebra and ODE Simulation
  • MAE 290B. Numerical Methods for Differential Equations

Additional Permitted Electives:

  • MAE 204. Robotics
  • MAE 206. Energy Systems
  • SIOC 202A. Fundamentals of Wave Physics 
  • SIOC 202B. Fundamentals of Wave Physics
  • SIOC 204. Underwater Acoustics
  • SIOC 205. Estuarine and Coastal Processes
  • SIOC 211A. Ocean Waves I
  • SIOC 261. Nearshore Physical Oceanography
MC80 - (Engineering Physics)

Energy & Climate

Students in the Energy & Climate track are exposed to a rigorous curriculum on the science and technology of abrupt climate change mitigation. This MS program focuses on thermal processes that drive climate change and the energy technologies that can help alleviate the radiative forcing on the atmosphere caused by greenhouse gases, clouds, and aerosols. Course selection is designed to prepare students to understand and to quantify radiative forcing processes and their effect on large-scale renewable power plants. The program is not specifically focused on Global Circulation Models (GCMs), but rather on the quantitative analysis required to understand the thermal forcing mechanisms that drive radiative imbalances at planetary and local scales.

Target Skill Sets and Learning Outcomes

Successful completion of this MS degree will enable students from various backgrounds to quantitatively analyze the potential for scalable renewable energy solutions in disrupting energy industry carbon emissions. Students will acquire theoretical and computational skills to evaluate the role of different greenhouse gases, clouds, and aerosols on climate forcing, and will develop a solid appreciation for the role that scalable renewable technologies need to play in the effort to decarbonize the atmosphere. Both engineers and atmospheric scientists will benefit from the coursework as it covers the fundamental principles underlying the complex thermal relationships between energy conversion and abrupt climate change, as well as the impact of large-scale renewable power generation on the local environment.

 

MC80 - MAE MS Program Requirements Checklist - Plan II (Comprehensive Exam) Students will use this checklist to plan their Master's program coursework and to make sure they are meeting Degree requirements.

Curriculum Requirements

FALL

WINTER

SPRING

MAE 221A. Heat Transfer*

MAE 221B. Mass Transfer*

MAE 256. Radiative Transfer for Energy Applications*

MAE 208. Mathematics for Engineers*

MAE 221C. Convection Heat Transfer*

or

MAE 206. Energy Systems*

MAE 119. Introduction to Renewable Energy: Solar & Wind

or

MAE 255. Boundary Layer and Renewable Energy Meteorology

SIOC 217A. Atmospheric and Climate Sciences I

SIOC 217B. Atmospheric and Climate Sciences II

MAE 221D. Radiation Heat Transfer

or

SIOC 217C. Atmospheric and Climate Sciences III

*Course includes a comprehensive exam component

Additional Programs Available Fall 2023

MC94 - (Biomechanics & Biomedical Engineering)

Biomechanics & Biomedical Engineering

Today we are witnessing rapid advancements in healthcare from understanding and using the mechanical behavior of biological entities across a tremendous range of scale, from molecules to organelles, cells, organs, and organisms. The multidisciplinary curriculum of B&BE, as a relatively new and exciting discipline, offers comprehensive training from the fundamental structure and function of biological systems to the applied design of medical devices to overcome unmet needs in healthcare. By virtue of the breadth of courses in B&BE from rigorous fundamentals to applied engineering, the student can construct a program tailored to their career aspirations, whether it be in research or industry. With an emphasis on the mechanical engineering perspective of B&BE, mathematics and physical analysis dominate training in fluid, continuum, cell, and molecular mechanics alongside training in biomaterials, computational methods, practical back-of-the-envelope design, immersion in the clinical environment alongside practitioners, and the handling of intellectual property and regulatory issues.
 

Target Skill Sets and Learning Outcomes

Completion of the B&BE MS degree will confer an ability to define and solve engineering problems in the creation of new medical technologies, and to have sufficient knowledge of what is known and unknown of the fundamental mechanisms underpinning biological systems to work towards creating new knowledge and exploiting current knowledge to benefit society. Direct interaction with clinical practitioners will provide the student with valuable experience toward understanding and solving problems in healthcare. Students with training from other engineering disciplines particularly electrical, computer and bioengineering will gain uniquely valuable multidisciplinary skills to lead or work in the burgeoning medical device industry. Those with training in allied fields of physics, chemistry, and biology will find themselves with key knowledge needed to enter and lead research and development work in B&BE, with the MS degree serving as the gateway to this new discipline.

Curriculum Requirements

 

FALL

WINTER

SPRING

MAE 208. Mathematics for Engineers*

MAE 2XX. Medical Device Experience I*

MAE 2XX. Medical Device Experience II*

MAE 201. Mechanics of Fluids*

MAE 262. Biological Fluid Mechanics

MAE 263. Experimental Methods in Cell Mechanics

MAE 261. Cardiovascular Fluid Mechanics

MAE 207. Design & Control of Haptic Systems

MAE 209. Continuum Mechanics Applied to Medicine/Biology*

*Course includes a comprehensive exam component

 

MC93 - (Controls & Mechatronics)

Controls & Mechatronics

The opportunities to apply control principles and methods are exploding. Computation, communication and sensing are becoming ubiquitous, with accelerating advances in the fabrication of devices including embedded processors, sensors, storage, and communication hardware. The increasing complexity of technological systems demands inter- and cross-disciplinary research and development.  The realized impact of control technology is matched by its anticipated future impact. Control is not only considered instrumental for evolutionary improvements in today's products, solutions, and systems; it is also considered a fundamental enabling technology for realizing future visions and ambitions in emerging areas such as biomedicine, renewable energy, and critical infrastructures. Based on the current level of MS enrollment in the courses that compose the C&M specialization, this is already a hugely successful specialization, and its formalization will provide students with more value in regards to the job market.

Target Skill Sets and Learning Outcomes

The MS degree in C&M will enable students to develop skills necessary to deal with multi-faceted systems and applications.  Students will be exposed to a multidisciplinary curriculum where they will develop an appreciation for building reliable systems, designing algorithms, analyzing dynamics, and formulating qualitative and quantitative properties. The C&M track puts particular emphasis in applications to robotics, haptics, and learning, but students will benefit from acquiring critical analytical thinking, practical understanding, and systems perspective that is applicable to other disciplines in the development of other large-scale, safety-critical, and mission-critical systems.

Curriculum Requirements

 

FALL

WINTER

SPRING

MAE 280A. Linear Systems Theory*

MAE 204. Robotics*

MAE 2XX. Soft Robotics

MAE 283A. Parametric Identification: Theory and Methods*

MAE 281A. Nonlinear Systems*

MAE 242. Robot Motion Planning*

Elective

Elective

Elective

*Course includes a comprehensive exam component
 

Permitted Electives:

  • MAE 144. Embedded Control and Robotics
  • MAE 145. Introduction to Robotic Planning and Estimation
  • MAE 207. Advanced Dynamics
  • MAE 207. Bioinspired Mobile Robotics
  • MAE 207. Design and Control of Haptic Systems
  • MAE 207. Numerical Linear Algebra
  • MAE 207. Safety for Autonomous Systems
  • MAE 280B. Linear Control Design
  • MAE 281B. Nonlinear Control
  • MAE 288A. Optimal Control
  • MAE 288B. Optimal Estimation

 

MC92 - (Power & Energy Systems)

Power & Energy Systems

Students in the Energy Systems track are exposed to a rigorous curriculum on fundamentals and applications in optimization of electric power systems. As the penetration of variable renewables (solar and wind) on the electric power grid has increased, the economic and reliable integration into the power system has become the principal engineering challenge. Power systems are also increasingly shifting away from an overly conservative, insufficiently metered, and inflexible operation. Modern power systems instead reduce operating costs and greenhouse gas emissions through flexible distributed energy resources (energy storage, electric vehicles, and flexible loads), abundant metering, and easier market access. The field of optimization lies at the intersection of these thrusts.
 

Target Skill Sets and Learning Outcomes

Successful completion of this MS degree will enable students from various backgrounds to understand and optimize the operation of electric power systems. Students will develop skills in solar and wind resource characterization and modeling, power systems modeling, and the optimization theory and applications to advance the field of electric power system planning and operation. Target employers are in the fields of renewables planning, energy systems consulting, and transmission system operation.

Curriculum Requirements

 

FALL

WINTER

SPRING

MAE 207. Electrical Power Systems Modeling*

MAE 206. Energy Systems*

MAE 207. Convex Optimization*

MAE 208. Mathematics for Engineers*

Elective

Elective

MAE 280A. Linear Systems Theory*

Elective

Elective

*Course includes a comprehensive exam component
 

Permitted Electives:

  • MAE 119. Introduction to Renewable Energy: Solar & Wind
  • MAE 125. Building Energy Efficiency
  • MAE 146. Introduction to Machine Learning Algorithms
  • MAE 207. Renewable Energy Integration
  • MAE 255. Boundary Layer and Renewable Energy Meteorology
  • MAE 256. Radiative Transfer for Energy Applications
  • MAE 280B. Linear Control Design
  • MAE 281A. Nonlinear Systems
  • MAE 281B. Nonlinear Control
  • MAE 283A. Parametric Identification: Theory and Methods
  • MAE 283B. Approximate Identification and Control
  • MAE 288A. Optimal Control
  • MAE 288B. Optimal Estimation

 

MC91 - (Computational Engineering & Science)

Computational Engineering & Science

Computational Engineering & Science (CE&S) is an interdisciplinary program that uses mathematical modeling and advanced computing to solve complex physical problems arising in engineering. Next to theory and experimentation, the use of high-fidelity numerical simulations that leverage high-performance computing environments has become the third paradigm of scientific discovery. Used for computer-based optimization, the same numerical tools are drivers for technological progress in mechanical and aerospace engineering.
 

Target Skill Sets and Learning Outcomes

The Computational Engineering & Science specialization provides students with a strong foundation in the development of the application of numerical methods and tools for the computer-based solution of complex engineering problems. The core curriculum encompasses comprehensive training in computational fluid dynamics, solid mechanics, and model reduction. In a parallel sequence of courses, the students can specialize in either large-scale computing, controls, or applied mathematics.

Curriculum Requirements

 

FALL

WINTER

SPRING

MAE 290A. Numerical Methods for Linear Algebra and ODE Simulation*

MAE 290B. Numerical Methods for Differential Equations*

MAE 290C. Computational Fluid Dynamics*

MAE 232A. Finite Element Methods in Solid Mechanics I*

MAE 232B. Finite Element Methods in Solid Mechanics II*

Elective

Elective

Elective

Elective

*Course includes a comprehensive exam component

Permitted Electives:

  • MAE 146. Introduction to Machine Learning Algorithms 
  • MAE 207. FEA for Coupled Problems
  • MAE 207. Model Reduction
  • MAE 207. Multidisciplinary Design Optimization
  • MAE 207. Numerical Linear Algebra
  • MAE 207. Uncertainty Quantification
  • MAE 232C. Finite Element Methods in Solid Mechanics III
  • MAE 280A. Linear Systems Theory
  • MAE 288A. Optimal Control
  • MAE 288B. Optimal Estimation
  • MAE 294A. Introduction to Applied Mathematics
  • MAE 294B. Introduction to Applied Mathematics II
  • MAE 294C. Introduction to Applied Mathematics II

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